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Posts tagged ‘thoroughbred’

30
May

Timing Rate of Skeletal Maturation in Horses

As a biomedical engineer by education, I make it a habit to understand the physiology of my favorite sport, horseback riding.

 

I was able to identify an outstanding article:

Timing Rate of Skeletal Maturation in Horses

By: Deb Benette, PhD

 

http://www.equinestudies.org/ranger_2008/ranger_piece_2008_pdf1.pdf

The article has a range of excellent information, including tables of maturation points of major bones.

Below are a number of quotes from the article portraying the main points sought by the author, but I encourage you to read the article in its entirety.

“Believe it or not many vets are totally unaware, as many members of the general public are also unaware, that horses have more than one “growth plate”, that there are multiple ossification centers pertaining to every bone of the body outside of the skull, and that the schedule of growth-plate closure (which begins around the time of birth and extends until the sixth year, and is coordinated with the eruption schedule of the teeth) has been well known to veterinarians, paleontologists, zooarchaeologists, and mammalogists since the early 19th century.”

“There is no such thing [as a] slow-maturing breed. The Quarter Horse is not an ‘early maturing’ breed – and neither is the Arabian a ‘slow maturing’ breed. As far as their skeletons go, they are the same. This information comes, I know, as a shock to many people who think starting their colt or filly under saddle at age two is what they ought to be doing. “

“While growth in cannon bone length stops with the fusion of both growth plates at around 1 ½ years of age, increase in cannon bone girth does not taper off until close to 5 years of age, and essentially the same can be said for the girth of any other limb element, with those bones located higher up in the body maturing later.”

“Most of the growth plates above the distal radius in a three year old horse are unfused, including, most importantly, those of the animal’s spine. It is the spine of the horse that governs the overall coordination of the limbs and the animal’s running “style”. It is the spine, not the limbs, that the animal primarily uses to compensate for potholes, slick spots, and other irregularities in the race track [or any track]. The higher the speed and the greater the physical effort, the more important it is that the animal have all of its joints mature and in good working order. While catastrophic failures are uncommon, more subtle distal limb disease and chronic pain and dysfunction in two and three year old racehorses are commonly diagnosed and are major causes for the “wastage” of young Thoroughbreds.”

“What people often don’t realize is that there is a “growth plate” on either end of every bone behind the skull, and in the case of some bones (like the pelvis or vertebrae, which have many “corners”) there are multiple growth plates.”

The lateness of vertebral “closure” is most significant for two reasons. One: in no limb are there 32 growth plates! Two: the growth plates in the limbs are (more or less) oriented perpendicular to the stress of the load passing through them, while those of the vertebral chain are oriented parallel to weight placed upon the horse’s back. Bottom line: you can sprain a horse’s back (i.e. displace the vertebral physes – see Figs. 5 and 8) a lot more easily than you can displace those located in the limbs.”

25
Apr

Origins of the Thoroughbred

By 

As mentioned in our previous article, the origins of all horses belonging to the Thoroughbred breed have been attributed to three Arabian Stallions. The Byerley Turk (the earliest of the three), The Darley Arabian, and The Godolphin Arabian.

The Thoroughbred Jockey Club has documented some 3 million Thoroughbreds in their “Stud Book” and approximately 40,000 registered each year. The extreme diversity of Thoroughbred Stallions is reflected by the industries’ demand for a “Live Cover” by the Stud being used. That is to say the Thoroughbred industry does not permit transported semen or artificial insemination of any kind. The Arabian Jockey Club does allow for transported and frozen semen which limits the diversity of Stallions.

The Thoroughbred Jockey Club owes its beginnings to James Weatherby who created the first “Stud Book” in 1791. He listed pedigrees of over 350 mares, each of which could be traced back to “Eclipse”, a descendant of The Darley Arabian, Matchem, a grandson of The Godolphin Arabian or Herod, A great grandson of The Byerley Turk.

The first TB to reach America was a Stallion named “Bulle Rock” in 1730. Some 186 Thoroughbred’s would be imported to the colonies forming the foundation of the Thoroughbred family tree. Colonel Sanders Bruce published the first American Stud Book in 1873 and was subsequently taken over by The Jockey Club.

Progeny of Stallions and mares relate primarily to earnings on the race track. “Storm Cat” commanded a stud fee of $500,000.00 and his sons and daughters have won over $100,000,000.00 and he is considered to be a “Sire of Sires.” Just as important as the Sire is the Mare, and one of the most important bloodlines of the 20th. Century is the Mare “La Troienne.”

A number of Champions trace back to her including Seattle Slew, A.P. Indy, Sea Hero, Go For Gin, Easy Goer, etc., etc. Smarty Jones also has two crosses to La Troienne and he has bloodlines that go back to a War Admiral and La Troienne cross.

So it must be obvious that with 40,000 registered Thoroughbreds it is impossible to give anything except a brief overview of Thoroughbred bloodlines. I would refer the reader to three excellent books: Designing Speed by Ken McLean; Racehorse Breeding Theories by Frank Mitchell; and finally The Byerley Turk by Jeramy James in which he characterized the first and greatest Arabian Stallion and his rise to prominence through Capt. Robert Byerley.

We’ll next take a look at the Standard bred Horse as well as the ever popular Quarter Horse.

Joy D. Cox
http://www.onlineanimalinfo.com/

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Joy_D_Cox

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/6520288

5
Oct

Horse Types and Temperaments

 
 

"Cold Blooded" Draft Horse Horse being discharged from Vet Hospital in WWI. Used via CC license from Library of Scotland

 

Horses are mammals, and as such are “warm-blooded” creatures, as opposed to cold-blooded reptiles. However, these words have developed a separate meaning in the context of equine terminology, used to describe temperament, not body temperature. For example, the “hot-bloods”, such as many race horses, exhibit more sensitivity and energy, while the “cold-bloods”, such as most draft breeds, are quieter and calmer.  Sometimes “hot-bloods” are classified as “light horses” or “riding horses”,with the “cold-bloods” classified as “draft horses” or “work horses”.

 

“Hot blooded” breeds include “oriental horses” such as the Akhal-Teke, Arabian horse, Barb and now-extinct Turkoman horse, as well as the Thoroughbred, a breed developed in England from the older oriental breeds. Hot bloods tend to be spirited, bold, and learn quickly. They are bred for agility and speed. They tend to be physically refined—thin-skinned, slim, and long-legged.  The original oriental breeds were brought to Europe from the Middle East and North Africa when European breeders wished to infuse these traits into racing and light cavalryhorses.

Hot Blooded Thoroughbred Race Horse

Muscular, heavy draft horses are known as “cold bloods”, as they are bred not only for strength, but also to have the calm, patient temperament needed to pull a plow or a heavy carriage full of people. They are sometimes nicknamed “gentle giants”.  Well-known draft breeds include the Belgian and the Clydesdale.  Some, like the Percheron and Friesian are lighter and livelier, developed to pull carriages or to plow large fields in drier climates.  Others, such as the Shire, are slower and more powerful, bred to plow fields with heavy, clay-based soils. The cold-blooded group also includes some pony breeds.

Warmblood” breeds, such as the Trakehner or Hanoverian, developed when European carriage and war horses were crossed with Arabians or Thoroughbreds, producing a riding horse with more refinement than a draft horse, but greater size and milder temperament than a lighter breed.  Certain pony breeds with warmblood characteristics have been developed for smaller riders.  Warmbloods are considered a “light horse” or “riding horse”.

Warmblood Horse Jumping

Today, the term “Warmblood” refers to a specific subset of sport horse breeds that are used for competition in dressage and show jumping.  Many warmbloods are selectively bred through careful cross breeding.  Strictly speaking, the term “warm blood” refers to any cross between cold-blooded and hot-blooded breeds.  However, if registered, reputable organizations will judge them based on the quality of the offspring, inspections, and/or performance results.  Examples include breeds such as the Irish Draught, Cleveland Bay, Canadian Warmblood, Dutch Warmblood or American Warmblood.

This work was adapted for use through the following:
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/